THE BIG BOOK OF KOMBUCHA: Brewing, Flavoring, and Enjoying the Health Benefits of Fermented Tea

Hannah Crum, Alex LaGory

Storey Publishing
March 8, 2016
$24.95 Paperback
ISBN-13: 978-1612124339

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authorsHannah Crum and her partner, Alex LaGory, are the founders of Kombucha Kamp, a leading mailorder supplier of kombucha supplies. Crum is recognized worldwide as “The Kombucha Mamma,” an industry journalist, a commercial brewing consultant, a featured speaker at health festivals nationwide, and a mentor to thousands of homebrewers around the world. Crum and LaGory live in Los Angeles.

Brewing your own kombucha at home is easy and fun! You can get exactly the flavors you want, and for a fraction of the cost of store-bought. This complete guide, from the proprietors of Kombucha Kamp (kombuchakamp.com), shows you how to do it from start to finish, with illustrated step-by-step instructions and recipes for 286 different flavor combinations. The book also includes information on the many health benefits of kombucha, fascinating details of the drink’s history, and recipes for delicious foods and drinks you can make with kombucha (including some irresistible cocktails!).

Making Beer, Wine, and Champagne from Kombucha

To make about 1 gallon of beer, wine, or champagne, you’ll need a brewing vessel that holds at least 1 1/4 gallons and has a lid with an airlock.

  • 2 teaspoons of ale, wine, or champagne yeast
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 gallon slightly sweet (young) fermented kombucha
  • 1 tablespoon dried hops (for beer only)
  • 1 ounce vodka

Activate the yeast by combining 2 teaspoons with the lukewarm water and sugar. Stir well; the mixture should form a slurry. Let the  mixture sit for 30 minutes to 1 hour and up to 2 days, until it is foaming. (Store leftover yeast in the freezer.)

Add the activated yeast mixture and the kombucha to the fermentation vessel. If you’re making beer, add the hops as well.

Put on the lid, with the airlock, and swish the contents around to mix them. Add the vodka to the airlock to prevent oxygen from getting into the brew.

Set the vessel in a warm, dark location; the ideal temperature range is 72-78 degrees Fahrenheit (22-26 degrees Celsius).

Bottling and Aging:

Beer: After 1 day, taste to determine if the hops have add enough flavor to the brew. To prevent over-bittering, do not leave them in for more than 2 days. Recap and continue to ferment for another 2 to 5 days. When the beer has the preferred bitter/sweet/tart flavor, pour into the bottles and cap tightly. Let sit in a cool, dark location for at least 1 week to build carbonation. The longer the bottles are left alone, the drier the flavor.

Wine: After 3 to 5 days, decant the wine into 750 mL bottles and cap tightly. Let sit in a cool, dark location for at least 1 week and up to a year. The longer the bottles are left alone, the drier the flavor.

Champagne: After 30 to 45 days, decant the champagne into 750 mL bottles and cap tightly. Let sit in a cool, dark location for at least 3 months and up to a year. The longer the fermentation time, the drier the flavor.

As with any carbonated beverage, bottle breakage can be an issue; take the necessary precautions. 


 

These recipes may be reproduced with the following credit:

Recipes from THE BIG BOOK OF KOMBUCHA: Brewing, Flavoring, and Enjoying the Health Benefits of Fermented Tea by Hannah Crum and Alex LaGory. (Storey Publishing, March 2016; $24.95/paperback; ISBN: 978-1612124339).

Contact: Pam Art
413-346-2100
pam.art@storey.com


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